Weekend Reading: Junk Food Could Be the Solution to Obesity

Happy Friday friends!

I keep having to tell myself that it’s not Monday today. Is it just me?

Yesterday was a crazy day – With Independence Day celebrations going on I didn’t really get much work done so it felt like a weekend. My favorite barista reminded me that even if today feels like Monday, I still get Saturday tomorrow!

Here’s a picture of a view from my front door yesterday – it’s a little bit crazy!

Independence Day downtown Raleigh

As far as reading this week, I only have a few articles because one of them is quite long but well worth reading.

For your reading pleasure:

The race to the shortest workout from Health & Science Dispatch
Exercise research is exploring ways to fit exercise into a busy lifestyle. Evidence is growing that high intensity, short duration exercise provides many of the same benefits as lower intensity longer duration exercises.

Your Choice In Utensils Can Change How Food Tastes from NPR
This article talks about a study that looks at how spoons, knives and other utensils we put in our mouths can provide their own kind of “mental seasoning” for a meal.

How Junk Food Can End Obesity from The Atlantic
This is a LONG article but well worth the read. Basically, organic, locally sourced food is great but not everyone can afford it and not everyone wants to drink a kale smoothie. This especially applies to lower-income people who are also more likely to be obese. So producers of evil processed food can and should play important roles in finding solutions to obesity. Even small improvements in the nutritional content of foods – think Egg White McMuffins – can be incredibly beneficial for our weight and overall health. So instead of demonizing processed food, maybe we should work with the companies that make it to help them make healthier foods. As Matt Raymond from the Food Insight Blog put it, “In the long run, it will be far better for our health to engage the companies that produce our food in constructive dialogues, rather than stigmatizing their very existence or making false, misleading, or anti-scientific claims about processed foods in general.”

What do you think? Can junk food be part of the solution to obesity?
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